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Chinese Antique Ming Chenghua blue-and-white vase From Sotheby's

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Chinese Antique Ming Chenghua blue-and-white vase From Sotheby's
Item Details
Description
Chinese Antique Ming Chenghua blue-and-white vase From Sotheby'sLot Information and SourceChenghua blue-and-white porcelain in Ming Dynasty is extremely rare, and there are no other examples that can be compared to such a huge standing piece. Chenghua porcelain body quality, decorative patterns, distinctive features. Made in the early days, it is similar to Xuande blue and white, and then gradually developed the unique style of the dynasty, creating unique varieties of the dynasty. This jade pot spring bottle has a delicate and pure body, and its shape and decoration show the style of the previous dynasty, but it is more exquisite and elegant, and it is unique and outstanding. This jade pot spring bottle has a rich and lustrous glaze, clean as jade, not slippery, although it is rich in luster, the unique glaze of Xuande porcelain is no longer seen, and the glaze is soft and beautiful like a palace bowl in the dynasty. For comparison, a pair of blue-and-white plum vases with curly grass patterns are used in cobalt blue, which bears the characteristics of Xuande, and is dated to an early Chenghua work. One of these is the collection of Robert C. Bruce, H.R.N. Norton and Dai Runzhai, which has been sold at Sotheby's London three times since 1953, most recently at Sotheby's Hong Kong, 8 October 2010, lot 2622. Another example is from the collection of the British Rail Foundation, sold at Sotheby's London, 1/2 April 1974, lot 197, and sold again at Sotheby's Hong Kong, 16 May 1989, lot 18. The two vases are reunited in Adrian Joseph's monograph, Ming Porcelain. Their Origins and Development, London, 1971, pl. 39.The changes in the curve of the classic jade pot and spring bottle have created the characteristics of each dynasty. Emperor Hongwu of the Ming Dynasty preferred the jade pot spring bottle, and the decorations on the jade pot spring bottle changed a lot in that dynasty, which lasted to the Yongle and Xuande dynasties. Compared with the jade pot spring vase of the previous dynasty, this vessel is elegant in shape, with a slightly higher ring foot, with steps inside the foot, and a slightly wider and drooping belly. Harmonious and harmonious with the decoration, full of the atmosphere of the times.This bottle neck is painted with three layers of patterns, banana leaf pattern, curly grass pattern and drooping Ruyi cloud pattern. This type of decoration is the standard decoration on the 18th century jade pot and spring vase, and is rarely seen on Ming Dynasty vessels. However, a Ming Yongle jade pot and spring vase in the Qing Palace collection. The belly of the vessel is painted with bamboo stones, plantains and flower and grass railings. The neck is decorated with the same pattern. A Comparison of World Porcelains, Beijing, 2015, pl. 103; the foot circle of this Yongle example is also slanted outward, which is very similar to the present lot, and is different from the straight foot of the standard vessel.Geng Baochang, "Appraisal of Ming and Qing Porcelain", Hong Kong, 1993, Figure 175 (middle right) depicts a schematic diagram of Chenghua's fringe. The characteristics are obvious.The decorative painting on this bottle is natural and neat, reflecting the evolution of the times and aesthetics. In the mid-15th century, imported cobalt materials were exhausted, and the imperial kiln factory began to use domestic cobalt materials "Pingqing". "Pingping Qing", also known as "Pitang Qing", was produced in the area of ​​Leping, Jiangxi. "Jiangxi Dazhi. Tao Shu said: "Old Pitang Qing was produced in the Leping side of the prefecture, in the middle of Jiajing, Leping was killed, and then it was blocked." Due to its low iron content, the color of Ping Ping Qing material is warm and elegant, clear and bright, just like this utensil The color of the glaze is stable, the color of the hair is stable, the details of the pattern are well shaded, and the layers are distinct. There is no bright color of the early Su Ma Li Qing, and no rust spots left due to the high iron content of the cobalt material. The patterns painted on this bottle have varied lines, the lotus petals, branches and leaves are hooked and natural, and the brushwork is full of interest, which is not like the rhythm of ink painting.Chenghua porcelain is exquisite and elegant, mostly small pieces. Liu Xinyuan, a ceramic archaeologist, once compared the number of Xuande and Chenghua porcelain pieces unearthed from the Ming Imperial Site in Zhushan, Jingdezhen. The Chenghua emperor Zuo was more than double the number of Xuande pieces, but the number of fragments and remnants unearthed was less than half of the latter. See Liu Xinyuan, "The Records of Firing in Chenghua Kilns", The Emperor's Broken china: Reconstructing Chenghua Porcelain, Sotheby's London, 1995, p. 11. Likewise, this ratio is also reflected in the number of handed down products from the two dynasties.One of the Chenghua pieces can be used for reference. It also has a raised foot ring and set ears. It was once in the collection of L.A. Basmadgieff. It was sold at Sotheby's London, 11 December 1979, lot 278, and then sold at Sotheby's Hong Kong. Forbes April 8, 2011, lot 3199. A blue-and-white phoenix wearing lotus-shaped vase, illustrated in The Emperor's Broken china: Reconstructing Chenghua Porcelain, cited above, pl. A blue-and-white vase with intertwined branches and flowers in the Palace Museum, Beijing, see "The Collection of Treasures of Cultural Relics in the Palace Museum." Blue and White Underglaze Red (middle), Shanghai, 2000, pl. 1. Another example of a blue-and-white plum vase, dated to Chenghua, see Geng Baochang, cited above, p. 88, pl. 150; also refer to the same book, plate 152, of a figure-patterned vase; the same book also contains another blue-and-white vase with flowers and lotus petals, color plate 33, Fig. 151, will be auctioned at Sotheby's New York, 20 March 2018, lot 113.
Condition
Source: Chen Yujie Collection Christie's Hong Kong, 29 May 2013, lot 1936, catalogue refers to the eighteenth century ceramic 30.3 cm, 12 inches
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Chinese Antique Ming Chenghua blue-and-white vase From Sotheby's

Estimate $500,000 - $800,000
Sep 30, 2022
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Starting Price $1,000
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0319: Chinese Antique Ming Chenghua blue-and-white vase From Sotheby's
Lot Passed8 Bids
Est. $500,000 - $800,000Starting Price $1,000
Chinese Art and Antiques
Sep 30, 2022 9:00 PM EDT
Buyer's Premium 15%
Lot 0319 Details
Description
...
Chinese Antique Ming Chenghua blue-and-white vase From Sotheby'sLot Information and SourceChenghua blue-and-white porcelain in Ming Dynasty is extremely rare, and there are no other examples that can be compared to such a huge standing piece. Chenghua porcelain body quality, decorative patterns, distinctive features. Made in the early days, it is similar to Xuande blue and white, and then gradually developed the unique style of the dynasty, creating unique varieties of the dynasty. This jade pot spring bottle has a delicate and pure body, and its shape and decoration show the style of the previous dynasty, but it is more exquisite and elegant, and it is unique and outstanding. This jade pot spring bottle has a rich and lustrous glaze, clean as jade, not slippery, although it is rich in luster, the unique glaze of Xuande porcelain is no longer seen, and the glaze is soft and beautiful like a palace bowl in the dynasty. For comparison, a pair of blue-and-white plum vases with curly grass patterns are used in cobalt blue, which bears the characteristics of Xuande, and is dated to an early Chenghua work. One of these is the collection of Robert C. Bruce, H.R.N. Norton and Dai Runzhai, which has been sold at Sotheby's London three times since 1953, most recently at Sotheby's Hong Kong, 8 October 2010, lot 2622. Another example is from the collection of the British Rail Foundation, sold at Sotheby's London, 1/2 April 1974, lot 197, and sold again at Sotheby's Hong Kong, 16 May 1989, lot 18. The two vases are reunited in Adrian Joseph's monograph, Ming Porcelain. Their Origins and Development, London, 1971, pl. 39.The changes in the curve of the classic jade pot and spring bottle have created the characteristics of each dynasty. Emperor Hongwu of the Ming Dynasty preferred the jade pot spring bottle, and the decorations on the jade pot spring bottle changed a lot in that dynasty, which lasted to the Yongle and Xuande dynasties. Compared with the jade pot spring vase of the previous dynasty, this vessel is elegant in shape, with a slightly higher ring foot, with steps inside the foot, and a slightly wider and drooping belly. Harmonious and harmonious with the decoration, full of the atmosphere of the times.This bottle neck is painted with three layers of patterns, banana leaf pattern, curly grass pattern and drooping Ruyi cloud pattern. This type of decoration is the standard decoration on the 18th century jade pot and spring vase, and is rarely seen on Ming Dynasty vessels. However, a Ming Yongle jade pot and spring vase in the Qing Palace collection. The belly of the vessel is painted with bamboo stones, plantains and flower and grass railings. The neck is decorated with the same pattern. A Comparison of World Porcelains, Beijing, 2015, pl. 103; the foot circle of this Yongle example is also slanted outward, which is very similar to the present lot, and is different from the straight foot of the standard vessel.Geng Baochang, "Appraisal of Ming and Qing Porcelain", Hong Kong, 1993, Figure 175 (middle right) depicts a schematic diagram of Chenghua's fringe. The characteristics are obvious.The decorative painting on this bottle is natural and neat, reflecting the evolution of the times and aesthetics. In the mid-15th century, imported cobalt materials were exhausted, and the imperial kiln factory began to use domestic cobalt materials "Pingqing". "Pingping Qing", also known as "Pitang Qing", was produced in the area of ​​Leping, Jiangxi. "Jiangxi Dazhi. Tao Shu said: "Old Pitang Qing was produced in the Leping side of the prefecture, in the middle of Jiajing, Leping was killed, and then it was blocked." Due to its low iron content, the color of Ping Ping Qing material is warm and elegant, clear and bright, just like this utensil The color of the glaze is stable, the color of the hair is stable, the details of the pattern are well shaded, and the layers are distinct. There is no bright color of the early Su Ma Li Qing, and no rust spots left due to the high iron content of the cobalt material. The patterns painted on this bottle have varied lines, the lotus petals, branches and leaves are hooked and natural, and the brushwork is full of interest, which is not like the rhythm of ink painting.Chenghua porcelain is exquisite and elegant, mostly small pieces. Liu Xinyuan, a ceramic archaeologist, once compared the number of Xuande and Chenghua porcelain pieces unearthed from the Ming Imperial Site in Zhushan, Jingdezhen. The Chenghua emperor Zuo was more than double the number of Xuande pieces, but the number of fragments and remnants unearthed was less than half of the latter. See Liu Xinyuan, "The Records of Firing in Chenghua Kilns", The Emperor's Broken china: Reconstructing Chenghua Porcelain, Sotheby's London, 1995, p. 11. Likewise, this ratio is also reflected in the number of handed down products from the two dynasties.One of the Chenghua pieces can be used for reference. It also has a raised foot ring and set ears. It was once in the collection of L.A. Basmadgieff. It was sold at Sotheby's London, 11 December 1979, lot 278, and then sold at Sotheby's Hong Kong. Forbes April 8, 2011, lot 3199. A blue-and-white phoenix wearing lotus-shaped vase, illustrated in The Emperor's Broken china: Reconstructing Chenghua Porcelain, cited above, pl. A blue-and-white vase with intertwined branches and flowers in the Palace Museum, Beijing, see "The Collection of Treasures of Cultural Relics in the Palace Museum." Blue and White Underglaze Red (middle), Shanghai, 2000, pl. 1. Another example of a blue-and-white plum vase, dated to Chenghua, see Geng Baochang, cited above, p. 88, pl. 150; also refer to the same book, plate 152, of a figure-patterned vase; the same book also contains another blue-and-white vase with flowers and lotus petals, color plate 33, Fig. 151, will be auctioned at Sotheby's New York, 20 March 2018, lot 113.
Condition
...
Source: Chen Yujie Collection Christie's Hong Kong, 29 May 2013, lot 1936, catalogue refers to the eighteenth century ceramic 30.3 cm, 12 inches
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