lots of lots

Castilian school; 16th Century. "Rest from the flight to Egypt." Oil on wood. crawled. It presents

Similar Sale History

View More Items in Paintings
item-137279644=1
item-137279644=2
item-137279644=3
item-137279644=4
item-137279644=5
item-137279644=6
item-137279644=7
Castilian school; 16th Century. "Rest from the flight to Egypt." Oil on wood. crawled. It presents
Item Details
Description
Castilian school; 16th century.
"Rest from the Flight into Egypt".
Oil on panel. Engatillada.
It has cracks in the panel, caused by the passage of time.
It has a 19th century frame, following models from the Gothic period.
Measurements: 117 x 90 cm: 170 x 111 cm (frame).
In this devotional scene, the artist depicts a divine story from a gentle, intimate and personal perspective. The theme, taken from the Gospel According to St. Matthew, narrates how an angel appears in a dream to St. Joseph and tells him that he must flee to Egypt together with Mary and the Child, because King Herod was looking for him to kill him. In this case, the author moves away from all drama and fixes his work on a specific moment, a stop on the way of the Holy Family, fleeing to Egypt. St Joseph is holding a palm leaf in one hand, from which he has taken several dates, which he offers to his son. The latter, lulled by his mother who watches the scene attentively, approaches the fruit with curiosity. Aesthetically, the work follows the stylistic precepts of German engravings. The artist, who bases the composition of the scene on a precise drawing with well-defined lines, also shows his mastery of colour by playing with the complementary tones of Saint Joseph's tunic and cloak. Despite the distortion of the anatomies of all the figures, typical of the period, the artist has succeeded in capturing a great dynamism in the piece, which is provided by the harmonisation of a clear triangular compositional structure. He portrays the figures with angular lines that intensify the sensation of movement and gives the cloaks great prominence by showing them fluttering in the wind.
At the beginning of the 16th century, Spain was the European nation best prepared to receive the new humanist concepts of life and art due to its spiritual, political and economic conditions, although from the point of view of plastic forms, its adaptation of those introduced by Italy was slower due to the need to learn the new techniques and to change the taste of the clientele. Anatomy, the movement of the figures, compositions with a sense of perspective and balance, the naturalistic play of folds and the classical attitudes of the figures soon began to be valued, but the strong Gothic tradition maintained expressiveness as a vehicle for a deep spiritualist sense. This strong and healthy tradition favoured the continuity of religious painting by adding a sense of balance that prevented its predominance over the immaterial content that animated the forms. In the early years of the century, Italian works arrived in our lands and some of our artists went to Italy, where they learned the new standards at first hand in the most progressive centres of Italian art, whether in Florence or Rome, or even in Naples.
Buyer's Premium
  • 26%

Castilian school; 16th Century. "Rest from the flight to Egypt." Oil on wood. crawled. It presents

Estimate €9,000 - €10,000
Oct 13, 2022
See Sold Price
Starting Price €6,000
Shipping, Payment & Auction Policies
Ships from Barcelona, -, Spain
Setdart Auction House
Setdart Auction HouseBarcelona, Spain
662 Followers
logo
www.liveauctioneers.com
item
0077: Castilian school; 16th Century. "Rest from the flight to Egypt." Oil on wood. crawled. It presents
Sold for €7,0003 Bids
Est. €9,000 - €10,000Starting Price €6,000
13th October - Old Masters
Oct 13, 2022 9:30 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 26%
Lot 0077 Details
Description
...
Castilian school; 16th century.
"Rest from the Flight into Egypt".
Oil on panel. Engatillada.
It has cracks in the panel, caused by the passage of time.
It has a 19th century frame, following models from the Gothic period.
Measurements: 117 x 90 cm: 170 x 111 cm (frame).
In this devotional scene, the artist depicts a divine story from a gentle, intimate and personal perspective. The theme, taken from the Gospel According to St. Matthew, narrates how an angel appears in a dream to St. Joseph and tells him that he must flee to Egypt together with Mary and the Child, because King Herod was looking for him to kill him. In this case, the author moves away from all drama and fixes his work on a specific moment, a stop on the way of the Holy Family, fleeing to Egypt. St Joseph is holding a palm leaf in one hand, from which he has taken several dates, which he offers to his son. The latter, lulled by his mother who watches the scene attentively, approaches the fruit with curiosity. Aesthetically, the work follows the stylistic precepts of German engravings. The artist, who bases the composition of the scene on a precise drawing with well-defined lines, also shows his mastery of colour by playing with the complementary tones of Saint Joseph's tunic and cloak. Despite the distortion of the anatomies of all the figures, typical of the period, the artist has succeeded in capturing a great dynamism in the piece, which is provided by the harmonisation of a clear triangular compositional structure. He portrays the figures with angular lines that intensify the sensation of movement and gives the cloaks great prominence by showing them fluttering in the wind.
At the beginning of the 16th century, Spain was the European nation best prepared to receive the new humanist concepts of life and art due to its spiritual, political and economic conditions, although from the point of view of plastic forms, its adaptation of those introduced by Italy was slower due to the need to learn the new techniques and to change the taste of the clientele. Anatomy, the movement of the figures, compositions with a sense of perspective and balance, the naturalistic play of folds and the classical attitudes of the figures soon began to be valued, but the strong Gothic tradition maintained expressiveness as a vehicle for a deep spiritualist sense. This strong and healthy tradition favoured the continuity of religious painting by adding a sense of balance that prevented its predominance over the immaterial content that animated the forms. In the early years of the century, Italian works arrived in our lands and some of our artists went to Italy, where they learned the new standards at first hand in the most progressive centres of Italian art, whether in Florence or Rome, or even in Naples.
Contacts
Setdart Auction House
34696958702
C/ d'Arago, 346 Bajos
Barcelona, 08009
Spain
LiveAuctioneers Supportinfo@liveauctioneers.com
iphoneandroidPhone

Get notifications from your favorite auctioneers.

TOP