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Byzantine Christian bronze icon Saint Nicholas, 600 AD

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Byzantine Christian bronze icon Saint Nicholas, 600 AD
Item Details
Description
Byzantine Christian bronze icon Saint Nicholas (?) with a sword, circa 600-1000AD. We don’t know for sure who was a Saint holding a sword in the right hand and a temple in the left hand: St George, St Nicholas or somebody else?These objects were made at a time when tremendous effort and innovation went into producing art with Christian themes. Size: 58 x 62 mm;Thickness: 2 mm; Weight: 55.79 g; Condition: All have heavy patina and wear; there are several holes on the sides of the Saint, but it looks like there were made on purpose. Provenance: Ex-Estate of M. Reiniger, Chicago, ILAll items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases. Religious dispute over iconoclasmMain article: Byzantine iconoclasmThe 8th and early 9th centuries were also dominated by controversy and religious division over Iconoclasm, which was the main political issue in the Empire for over a century. Icons (here meaning all forms of religious imagery) were banned by Leo and Constantine from around 730, leading to revolts by iconodules (supporters of icons) throughout the empire. After the efforts of empress Irene, the Second Council of Nicaea met in 787 and affirmed that icons could be venerated but not worshiped. Irene is said to have endeavoured to negotiate a marriage between herself and Charlemagne, but, according to Theophanes the Confessor, the scheme was frustrated by Aetios, one of her favorites.[82]In the early 9th century, Leo V reintroduced the policy of iconoclasm, but in 843 Empress Theodora restored the veneration of icons with the help of Patriarch Methodios.[83] Iconoclasm played a part in the further alienation of East from West, which worsened during the so-called Photian schism, when Pope Nicholas I challenged the elevation of Photios to the patriarchate.[84]
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Byzantine Christian bronze icon Saint Nicholas, 600 AD

Estimate $4,000 - $8,000
Sep 17, 2016
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Starting Price $1,500
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Eternity Gallery

Eternity Gallery

Tampa, FL, United States
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0026A: Byzantine Christian bronze icon Saint Nicholas, 600 AD

Lot Passed
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Est. $4,000 - $8,000Starting Price $1,500
September 2016 Asian, Europian Arts, Antiques
Sep 17, 2016 10:00 AM EDT
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Lot 0026A Details

Description
...
Byzantine Christian bronze icon Saint Nicholas (?) with a sword, circa 600-1000AD. We don’t know for sure who was a Saint holding a sword in the right hand and a temple in the left hand: St George, St Nicholas or somebody else?These objects were made at a time when tremendous effort and innovation went into producing art with Christian themes. Size: 58 x 62 mm;Thickness: 2 mm; Weight: 55.79 g; Condition: All have heavy patina and wear; there are several holes on the sides of the Saint, but it looks like there were made on purpose. Provenance: Ex-Estate of M. Reiniger, Chicago, ILAll items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases. Religious dispute over iconoclasmMain article: Byzantine iconoclasmThe 8th and early 9th centuries were also dominated by controversy and religious division over Iconoclasm, which was the main political issue in the Empire for over a century. Icons (here meaning all forms of religious imagery) were banned by Leo and Constantine from around 730, leading to revolts by iconodules (supporters of icons) throughout the empire. After the efforts of empress Irene, the Second Council of Nicaea met in 787 and affirmed that icons could be venerated but not worshiped. Irene is said to have endeavoured to negotiate a marriage between herself and Charlemagne, but, according to Theophanes the Confessor, the scheme was frustrated by Aetios, one of her favorites.[82]In the early 9th century, Leo V reintroduced the policy of iconoclasm, but in 843 Empress Theodora restored the veneration of icons with the help of Patriarch Methodios.[83] Iconoclasm played a part in the further alienation of East from West, which worsened during the so-called Photian schism, when Pope Nicholas I challenged the elevation of Photios to the patriarchate.[84]

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